Visit the Lafayette Course Catalog for the official course description and listing

CHEM 101 – Chemistry of the Environment

An introduction to the chemical principles relevant to understanding environmental problems that result from chemical environmental pollutants, and the development of technological approaches to resolving them. Historical case-studies as well as contemporary environmental issues are considered by understanding the relevant chemistry, the analysis of appropriate scientific data and models, as well as technological solutions, societal impacts, and regulatory approaches and challenges necessary to overcome these environmental problems. [STSC]

CHEM 103 – General Chemistry I with Recitation

Students will understand the basic principles of reaction stoichiometry, atomic structure, chemical bonding and chemical thermodynamics. They will develop strategies and skills for solving quantitative and qualitative problems. The laboratory work illustrates fundamental principles emphasizing proper laboratory techniques.

CHEM 107, 108 – General Chemistry I/II

Students will understand the basic principles of reaction stoichiometry, atomic structure, chemical bonding, chemical thermodynamics, and kinetics. They will develop strategies and skills for solving quantitative and qualitative problems. The laboratory work illustrates fundamental principles emphasizing proper laboratory techniques.  Prerequisite: CHEM 103 or 107 for CHEM 108.

CHEM 201 – Environmental Chemistry

This course discusses the chemical principles underlying natural processes and the ways in which human activity affects those processes. Sources, sinks, and interactions of important environmental compounds are investigated.  Prerequisite: CHEM 108.

CHEM 211 – Foundational Inorganic Chemistry

Introduces the theories of atomic structure and bonding in main-group and solid-state compounds. Common techniques for characterizing inorganic compounds such as NMR, IR, and mass spectrometry are discussed. Descriptive chemistry of main group elements is examined. Conductivity, magnetism, superconductivity, and an introduction to bioinorganic chemistry are additional topics in the course. In lieu of the laboratory, students have a project on a topic of their choice. Serves as an advanced chemistry elective for biochemistry majors.  Prerequisite: CHEM 108.

CHEM 221 – Foundational Organic Chemistry

General aspects of organic chemistry including nomenclature, structure, reactions, synthesis, and spectroscopy are surveyed. This course is intended to prepare students for a career in chemistry or biochemistry, as well as the medical and engineering professions. Lecture/laboratory.  Prerequisite: CHEM 108.

CHEM 231 – Foundational Analytical Chemistry

A thorough study of the fundamental techniques and theoretical background of classical volumetric and gravimetric analysis together with some instrumental analytical methods such as colorimetry, potentiometry, and separation techniques. Lecture/laboratory. Prerequisite: CHEM 108

CHEM 321 – Advanced Organic Chemistry

General aspects of organic chemistry including nomenclature, structure, reactions, synthesis, and spectroscopy are surveyed. This course is intended to prepare students for a career in chemistry or biochemistry, as well as the medical and engineering professions. Lecture/laboratory.

CHEM 331 – Advanced Analytical Chemistry

A study of advanced optical, electroanalytical, chromatographic, and other instrumental methods of analysis. Lecture/laboratory.  Prerequisite: CHEM 221, 231, and 341, or 342, or 343.

CHEM 341 – Elementary Physical Chemistry

A one-semester course designed primarily for A.B. majors and premedical students. A study of gas properties, thermodynamics, elementary quantum mechanics, kinetics, and lasers.  Prerequisite: CHEM 108 or 211; PHYS 112; MATH 125, 162, or 172.

CHEM 342 – Physical Chemistry I

A study of classical thermodynamics, equilibria, ideal and real gases, and solutions. The laboratory focuses on the thermodynamics of phase changes, solution formation, and chemical reactions. Lecture/laboratory.  Prerequisite: PHYS 112, 122, or 131; MATH 162; CHEM 108.

CHEM 343 – Physical Chemistry II

This course covers quantum mechanics, spectroscopy, and kinetics. The laboratory utilizes techniques in IR and UV-VIS absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy to investigate concepts in quantum mechanics, spectroscopy, and kinetics. Prerequisite: PHYS 112, 122, or 131; MATH 162; CHEM 108.

CHEM 342 – Advanced Organic Chemistry*

This course builds upon the basic concepts and reactions of organic chemistry. Topics to be included are the effect of structure on chemical reactivity, molecular orbital theory as applied to organic molecules, heterocyclic chemistry, natural products chemistry, and the application of computers to organic chemistry. Lecture.    Prerequisite: CHEM 222.

CHEM 351 – Survey of Biochemistry

This course provides an understanding of structure, function, and metabolism of biological molecules including proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids. Other topics include enzyme catalysis, bioenergetics, metabolic control mechanisms, and information transfer at the molecular level.  Prerequisite:  CHEM 221.

CHEM 352 – Foundational Biochemistry

This course is intended as the first of a two-semester series in biochemistry. This course focuses on understanding the structure, function, isolation and analysis of the four major classes of biological molecules: proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids. Other topics include enzyme catalysis, mechanisms, kinetics, and regulation, the structure of cellular membranes, and information transfer at the molecular level.  Prerequisite:  CHEM 222.

CHEM 353 – Advanced Biochemistry

This course is intended as the second of a two-semester series in biochemistry. This course focuses on understanding the major pathways of carbohydrate, lipid, and nitrogen metabolism, and integration and control of these pathways. Other topics include transport across membranes, cellular signal transduction, photosynthesis and carbon fixation, and the molecular basis of human disease.   Prerequisite:  CHEM 352.

CHEM 354 – Experimental Biochemistry

(Formerly CHEM 352). This course provides laboratory experience and a theoretical analysis of modern preparative, analytical, and physical techniques utilized for the study of proteins, nucleic acids, polysaccharides, membranes, and organelles. Lecture/laboratory.  Prerequisite: CHEM 352.

CHEM 365/366 – Course-based Research Experience in Chemistry

A series of research projects carried out under the guidance of two faculty members. In addition to the
laboratory component of the course, students will learn proper laboratory record keeping,
presentation and writing skills, discuss issues related to diversity, equity, inclusion and social justice as
related to the chemical science, and address laboratory safety. [W] Lecture/Laboratory. Prereq. – CHEM 221.

CHEM 380 – Independent Research Experience

A research project carried out under the guidance of a faculty member at the ½ credit level, and differing from Chem 390 where full credit workload is required. This course does not count as an advanced chemistry elective . It may be taken multiple semesters, but no more than four total semesters.

CHEM 390 – Independent Study

This course can either be an independent research project or a study of one or more advanced topics in chemistry based on the interests of the student and faculty member.  This course does not count as an advanced chemistry elective.

CHEM 391 – Independent Study (W)

This course can either be an independent research project or a study of one or more advanced topics in chemistry based on the interests of the student and faculty member.  This course does not count as an advanced chemistry elective. [W]

CHEM 392 – Independent Research

A research project carried out under the guidance of a faculty member. A formal presentation to the chemistry department is required.

CHEM 394 – Independent Research (W)

A research project carried out under the guidance of a faculty member. A formal presentation to the chemistry department is required. [W]

CHEM 408 – Topics in Medicinal Chemistry

This course examines topics in the chemistry of medicine with a focus on the drug discovery process
and the interaction of small organic molecules with biological systems.
Prereq. – CHEM 222.

CHEM 405 – Structure Determination by Physical Methods

Use of infrared, ultraviolet, nuclear magnetic resonance, mass spectrometry, and computational methods in the determination of the structures of organic molecules. These methods also have application to the problems of inorganic chemistry. Lecture/laboratory.  Prerequisite: CHEM 341, or 342, or 343.

CHEM 411 – Advanced Inorganic Chemistry

This course uses molecular orbital theory to explain the electronic structure and reactivity of inorganic complexes. Topics include symmetry and its applications to bonding and spectroscopy, electronic spectroscopy of transition-metal complexes, mechanisms of substitution and redox processes, organometallic and multinuclear NMR. [W]  Prerequisite: CHEM 213, 311, or 324, 325 or 326, MATH 162.

CHEM 445 – Special Topics in Physical Chemistry

A study of one or more selected topics of current interest in physical chemistry. Dependent upon staff, topics may include advanced spectroscopy, computational chemistry, materials chemistry, or statistical thermodynamics.  Prerequisite: The topics and prerequisites (CHEM 324 or 3245 depending on topics, or permission of instructor) for a given semester will be announced before registration.

CHEM 455 – Special Topics in Biochemistry

This course covers a variety of topics with emphasis on the molecular basis of human disease, new areas of biochemical research, and advances in biotechnology. Topics may include immunobiochemistry, molecular mechanisms of cellular signal transduction, advanced topics in metabolism, chemical carcinogenesis, and the physical basis of biochemical methodology.  Prerequisite: CHEM 350 or 361.

CHEM 470-480 – Special Topics

Dependent upon staff and student interest, one or more special topics in chemistry are examined.

CHEM 495, 496 – Thesis

A student may register for this course after meeting with department staff and finding a faculty member who agrees to act as his or her research adviser. Discussion of research areas with the faculty and preliminary work involving literature searching and planning should be completed before the beginning of the senior year. Research in some areas requires certain prerequisite courses.